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africa and southwestern asia takes us to egypt. here, as throughout this region, the presence or absence of water has profoundly influenced patterns of human settlement. the nile river is egypt's lifeblood. people here cling to its path through the desert and cluster in its broad delta. our case explores human modification of the environment as humans harness the mighty nile through projects like the aswan dam, lake nasser and the new toshka canal; the move from subsistence to commercial agriculture; and how an expanding population in the nile river delta is encroaching on the area's remaining precious farmland. from space, the earth can seem an abstract pattern of color and shape, but as we look closer, environmental processes come into view. here the rain of east-central africa collects in the giant lake victoria. its waters drain to the north, giving rise o of the world's great rirs, the nile descending from the african highlands, the nile winds through one of earth's most arid landscapes. coursing through the vast desert of northern africa, the waters of the nile nourish a ribbon of
, the president of the arab republic of egypt. i invite him to address the assembly. [applause] >> in the name of god, the compassionate, the compound -- the merciful, peace and prayers be on his profit, muhammed, a profit whom we love and follow. -- pitcairn a prohet who and we love and follow. the we respect him and we stand opposed to those who oppose him. the prayers of my god be upon him. daud described him in his koran as a man of great morality. also, it is said that we can have mercy of those who honor god. our peace and prayers are on him, his soul, and all those who followed him until after doomsday. may god give me the correct word to address you, you people who have been created male and female, peoples and tribes, to get to know each other, that the most dignified a view -- of view. and mr. president of the general assembly, mr. ban ki moon, the secretary general of the united nations, presidents, heads of government, ladies and gentlemen, i salute you in the name of islam. peace and prayers be on you. mr. president, it gives me pleasure to congratulate you and your friendly count
is reacting to these demonstrations. in egypt, whether it has some consequences, and look at these results and compare them. we have done a number of polls related to this including the spring of 2012. we found one in august 2011. there's also a chicago council in june 2012. we have a little bit of comparison. one of the things we read interested in finding out is how the public is internalizing what appeared to be slipping demonstrations initially. it look like they have support and they were very violent. a lot of commentary was "those people." we once to know what the american public sees as "thosepeopol -- those people." they see the attacks to be supported by the majority of arabs and muslims are the minorities? thinking about that for each country, would you say the violent attacks only supported by extremist minorities or the majority of the population? you can see a large majority, 63% on egypt and 31 term in libya believe they were only supported by extremists minorities. that is going to be interesting. it is hard to know how the public is internalizing these events. it looks lik
-- is as old as egypt itself. the pyramids at giza, the wonders of the ancient world, were not just designed as the pharaoh's last resting-place. they were the first stop on a long night's journey to everlasting life. by 1550 bc, power had shifted to a n kingdom 500 miles south in the ancient city of thebes, now called luxor. to the west, in the hills beyond the nile's west bank, the royal tombs of the valley of the kings were cut into limestone cliffs. their interiors are richly decorated with hieroglyphs and paintings-- signs and symbols that detail the necessary steps to attain immortality. egypt's power and the grandeur that came with it were well-established by 2500 bc when the great pyramids at giza were built. the sphinx was a philosophy of government set in stone. it depicted the king as fearless, cunning and brave as the lion. and as crucial to egypt as the nile itself. the king was not just a political leader but a religious leader too. in the minds of the ancient egyptians, the pharaoh's power and authority as a king stretched far beyond the boundaries of his country-- and into th
and egypt in august a lot of commentary with those people. so we can't have an idea of what the american people -- do they see this as, do they see the violent attacks take against the embassies to be supported by majorities of arabs and muslims, or by minorities? and that was really the first question that we had about that attacks in libya and in egypt. so thinking about that attacks in egypt and libya for each country would you say the violent attacks were only supported by extremist minorities or they were supported by majorities of the population? both egypt and libya. you can see he really large majorities, 63% on egypt, 61 on libya coming believe that these violent attacks were only supported by extremist minorities. so that that's kind of interesting because it was hard to know how the public is internalizing these events. it looks like they are blaming him primarily on extremist minorities. on the other hand when you ask them about their impression about whether the governments of egypt and libya try to protect american diplomats and their staff, look at this. majorities said th
just a minute, -- egypt, and elsewhere. the regime that reflects a figure like gadhafi, the availability of oil revenues to the centers, and the security apparatus allowing free expression and political participation which in 2011 avoided excessive use of force in containing public demonstrations and rioting in algier. while they are plausible explanation and point to algerians's exceptionalism, i feel there's a lack of reliable information on the diversity of views that algerians hold of their system of government, of their history, and of their preferred path forward. the inner workings of their politics is opaque and constant source of debate and speculation, even within political connected circles. i think analytic modesty is called for, and, after all, it would have been plausible to explain away the upheaval in tunisia in late 2010, for example. instead, i think we might ask what does instability look like in algeria? there does not appear to be a sizable appetite among algerians for mass upheaval. popular upheaval. the state, meanwhile, has shown itself able to c
around the middle east. now, this is congress. i would say this is egypt's game with some event taken off by turkey. the president has turned out to be an unexpected and welcome later in this chaos. loving brotherhoods is an organization that has officers in many places at the middle east. the people know it, it's old. in many ways it's quite trusted and it's politically experienced in the position of having an and the opposition, so it actually knows when an opposition is to do, even when it now no longer is in the opposition. now the question of course is will they adopt an extremist agenda now that they are in power as president but not he warned as, as president mubarak warned us. my view is that president morrissey is actually taking rather a middle-of-the-road line. he's keeping the arrangement of the camp david accord in place of israel and he is acting very statesmanlike. he has invited turkey, saudi arabia and iran to negotiate together over syria, if we beat any of those four players out, the cost of syria and linux. in the past, what's interesting though is turkey would have le
the obama administration pushes to give $450 million in emergency aid to egypt. top gop lawmaker moves to block that. can derail the handout for good? more "money" coming up ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your busins challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. ♪ . melissa: and now, to politics and oil. you would think oil coanies would contribute to campaigns that give them a high return, right? well, guess again. since 1990 oil and gas companies and their employees have focused the overwhelming majority of their political contributions on republican candidates. in total, 239 million, of 319 total that they have spent. but the oil industry actually does better when democrats are in office instead of republicans. i was shocked by this. so what gives? art gelber, founde and president of gelber and associates. art, great to see you again. i have got to tell you was really surprised by the stats opp
is coming from egypt, you don't speak about i don't talk the islamic state. they're talking about civil state with islamic reference. this is what they are saying. it means religion is not going to impose a structure. having said that, are we playing with words or are we now really talking about something which is the state is a bottom-up delegation of power and religion is something, coming from on high and it has no power on the decision of the state. what is coming from the new islamist and even some sociologists are saying this is no longer islamist. this is post-islamist. i don't even know what started and when it's ending, but we have some problems here with terminology. the point is that they're referring to islam and the our critical question that we have to ask it when it comes to the prerogative of the state in which we are dealing with the principle. my point here is to say the muslim military cut should be quite clear on 69 principles, but for me are not negotiable. the first one is rule of law. the second is equal citizenship for all, all the citizens, muslims and other fai
armi ining aunng t opposition >>> egypt's president promised to tackle problems that effect people's daily lives his first0. now that he's passed that milestone egyptians are paying close attention and assessing hi rfmae. we have mor from cairo. >> reporter: this website is called morsi meter. it shows thetas othew presidens program. it's become the most popular website in egypt. the site was sp by two egyptians. members of the public u the site to evaluate the progress of morsi. the site reis 6,000 to 10,000 hits a day. >> translator: under the evusovd have imagined ordinary citizens commenting on what the president was doing. >>epte tsan is a frequent visitor to the site. he posted a comment criticizing the president to solve the traffic problems >> translator: president morsi would be worse. he don't speak out against him we might suffer for another 30 years. >> reporter: president morsi is keenly aware he's being watched. a team of police officers were mobile to ease traffic congestion. they removed stalls set up on the roads by street vendors. the vendors quickly returned. cri
will not willfulfully step aside as we saw in tunisia, egypt, and even in gem men. i would argue it's not amenable. the second constant is that the opposition has beener. pettily divided, fragmented, unable to coe less around a unifying vision of a post assad syria. we have seen external opposition divisions inside syria, among the arms group, divisions based on personal rivalry and ideology, patron, and so forth. and the third factor is that the international community has remained at the stalemate. has been unable to reach a consensus on how to move forward in syria. we have seen three security counsel vetoes by russia and china. causing many to call the u.n. essentially ineffective in this crisis. it has been the interplay of these three factors, these three constant, i would argue that has lead syria down the path it has taken inspect terms of u.s. policy, u.s. policy is based on the open jective as having assad step aside back in august of 2011. the problem with u.s. policy is that it has continually been at conflict with itself in terms of how do achieve that objective while also achieving o
like mubarak in egypt and tunisia and yemen and whatnot. he has that middle ground, and he really gets a bum rep. if you read the conversations, the clinton tapes, he's expressing concerns and fears to clinton, and clinton is sympathetic with these things. needed a better pr organization to help him out. >> okay. by the way, is that patrick seal? >> is that patrick seal? patrick focused too much on the conspiracy theories of why certain things happened in the region. >> turning to egypt, you interviewed a lot of people in the movement. you mentioned the 1990s, obviously, where the, you know, basically the egyptians put down, and it is islamist insurgeon sigh and stapped to death, end of the movement. >> which, by the way, the leadership was against. >> the islamic -- >> in prison. >> yeah, yeah. they were much more. the question is, you know, is there any likelihood of the head of al-qaeda to resuscitate an al-qaeda-like group in egypt or other groups or egyptians gone through that in the 1990s seen as a dead end? how do you see that sort of militant movement in egypt playing out? >> h
, but in egypt, it is a different story. >> microbuses are a common sight on egypt's roads. they may be loud and clog up the streets, but for the millions of people who use them to get around every day, they are essential. in the city of weisel near cairo, they are everywhere. many of their owners swear by them, preferring them to other forms of transport. >> i have driven trucks and even tanks and chevrolet's, too, but this car -- i tell you, this car is unbeatable. >> love of the vw bus has led to some unusual modifications. the vehicles were first imported to egypt in the 1970's and had been -- have been a permanent feature on the streets ever since. if you want to hitch a ride, though, you first need to know the sign language. >> that means the pyramids, and that means the street, and this is how you get to the university. >> each journey costs a few since. the driver earns around 10 euros a day, enough to provide for his family, he says. the white vw buses have become indispensable in egypt's cities. life without them -- unimaginable. >> it is comfortable. >> sweet little cars. >> we wo
they might start with a temporary truce and then build on that. sho beppu, nhk world, damascus. >>> egypt's president mohamed morsi promised to tackle problems that affect people's daily lives during his first 100 days in office. now that he's passed that milestone, egyptians are paying close attention and assessing his performance. nhk world's yu kobayashi has more from cairo. >> reporter: this website shows the status of the new president's program. it's become the most popular website in egypt. the site was set up by two egyptians in their 20s. members of the public use the site to evaluate the progress of morsi's policies. the site receives 6,000 to 10,000 hits a day. >> translator: under the previous government, no one would have imagined ordinary citizens commenting on what the president was doing. >> reporter: this man is a frequent visitor to the site. he posted a comment criticizing the president's failure to solve the programs. >> translator: president morsi could be worse than mubarak. if we don't speak out against him, we might suffer for another 30 years. >> reporter: preside
stock of egypt and israel and had a set time and the lord will do this thing in the land and the lord did this thing the next day and all the life stock of egypt died but the life stock of children of israel not one died and the pharaoh went and not one of the israelites was died and the lord said to moses take for yourself and handful of ashes from a furnace and let moses scatter towards the heavens and in the sight of pharaoh it and become fine dust in egypt and boils that break out on man and beast and all the land of egypt. >> thanks. next speaker. >> yes, i am born and raised in san francisco. i have been been back for a while. i am asking some probably questions. i didn't hear if you're allowed to get a response. for instance why can't citizens pull items from the consent agenda? in el dorado county in tal hoe citizens can pull and the amount of time is different than what you stated and i took the bus to get here and all the people who may have been spread out around the park -- i call it plaza park were kind of more angry than ever on turk street. they have no place to
, this coming on the back of the publication of findings that lead directly to the disaster. egypt is stepping up efforts to bring back the tourists after many were scared off by the violence in the areas. our correspondent has the. >> these are hard times for the camels and their owners who make a living off the tourists who visit egypt's most popular monuments. the souvenir stands with their rows of pharaohs, plates and pyramids are all looking sadly empty. though one shop owner is putting on a combrave face. >> must be hard for you and your family and all the people working here. >> yes. because we are working with torturists. >> the problem is many westerners still see egypt as something of a war zone. this man is an american tourist in egypt. >> they said if you go there, you're going to get kidnapped and al qaeda is going to kill you. not true. what i found here so far is people are very nice. they welcome torturists and i haven't had any problems. >> so now ministers have stepped up efforts to reassure the world. after a long restoration project -- >> look around you. lots of people ar
nuclear more than us. the people in saudi arabia, and egypt, jordan, so for that matter i think we will have to take action. and if the u.s. would decide to sit idly by and watch and to pray in order to take action, israel will have to do it by itself. it will not be easy. it will be harder. to deal with retaliation not only from iran. they will be nation's flying in from iran, from lebanon, hezbollah will join. hamas in gaza will send hundreds of missiles. but if we have to choose today between the option of allowing iran to become nuclear, to the option of fighting ourselves, i think the is a clear message what we will do. and the question is if will do with the u.s. or without the u.s., we are asking today. one of the main points of my book, i know many people here are involved with the middle east is the issue of two-state solution. for the last 20 years we hear about two-state solution. you must finish the conflict, the resolution will be a palestinian state. and president obama adopted this approach and she's calling upon us, the israelis to build a palestinian state and go b
is internalizing what seems to be slipping demonstrations initially and very violent and egypt and a lot of commentary was those people, those people. so, we wanted to have an idea of what the american public internalized. do they see this as a -- do they see the violent attacks, particularly against the embassies to be supported by the majorities of the arabs and muslims and about was really the first question that we had about the attack in libya and egypt. and so, thinking about the attack on libya and egypt for each country would you say that it was only supported by extremist minorities was supported by the majorities of population for both egypt and libya? and you can see here the large majority, 63% on egypt, 61% on libya believed the violent attacks were only supported by extremist minorities. so, that is kind of interesting because it was hard to know how the public was internalizing these events. looks like they are blaming it primarily on the extremist minorities. on the other hand, when you ask about the impression of whether the government of egypt or libya tried to protect
million in emergency aid to egypt. top gop lawmaker moves to block that. can derail the handout for good? more "money" coming up ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ how do you help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fiftanniversary of remission? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech mastpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. whatever your business challenge, when we got married. i had three kids. and she became the full time mother of three. it was soccer, and ballet, and cheerleading, and baseball. those years were crazy. so, as we go into this next phase, you know, a big part of it for us is that there isn't anything on the schedule. ♪ . melissa: and now, to politics and oil. you would think oil companies would contribute to campaigns that give them a high return, right? well, guess again. since 1990 oil and gas compan
governor john lynch. then, a firsthand look at the political unrest in egypt, syria and libya by a fellow with the new america foundation who recently travel today the middle east. traveled to the middle east. and later retired supreme court justice john paul stevens speaks to a conference about gun laws, gun violence and his dissents in the court's cases involving the second amendment. >> c-span brings a special perspective into what's happening in washington, particularly your coverage of the house and the senate. so if something is going on in the house and the senate -- andw something will go on in the next five years, maybe not this7 year -- c-span covers this authoritatively, very, very well, and it's one of the major news sources or news happenings in washington. we're all struggling with what's going to happen with health care. i mean, c-span was the authoritative voice covering what happened with health care. we're worried about the financial system. c-span, again, is the authoritative voice in terms of what the congress is doing or won't do in terms of the financial system. >>
before the revolution in egypt began, i told arab leaders gathered in doha that the region's foundations were sinking into the sand. it was clear even then that the status quo was unsustainable, that refusal to change was itself becoming a threat to stability. so for the united states, supporting democratic transition is not a matter of idealism. it is a strategic necessity, and we will not return to the false choice between freedom and stability. and we will not go back our support for emerging democracies when the going gets rough. that would be a costly, strategic mistake that would, i believe, undermine both the hour interests and our values. now we recognize that these transitions are not america's to manage. and certainly not ours to win or lose, but we have to stand with those who are working every day to strengthen democratic institutions, defend universal rights and drive inclusive economic growth. that will produce more capable partners and more durable security over the long term. today, these transitions are entering a phase that must be marked more by compromised then by con
of natural gas between israel and egypt. and the joinlt projects of energy resources in the middle east between israel and jordan. does that come to play with something you said. >> another excellent question. three home run questions from three freshmen. [laughter] the united states is very 0 supportive of efforts in the middle east to try to work out some of the challenges to the production and exporting of energy. and i think you know from having been in israel, israel has made some significant finds of natural gas off the coastline, and there's also the potential for such new energy sources off of cypress, off of lebanon, and we have been urging diplomatically that everybody work out their boundaries, that gets me back to one of the points i was making because there's often overlapping claimant -- -- claims and unless they're resolved stand in the way of the commercial exemployeation of whatever the reserves night be. it's in everyone's interest to try to make sure. everybody know where the boundaries are and people are able to let contracts that will be legally recognized in order
berry. this is "early today," your first stop of the day today on your nbc station. >>> in egypt one of the world's seven wonders has received a makeover. the question is, will people visit? the country's second largest pyramid reopened after nearly three years of restorations. several tombs were also unveiled with new ventilation systems and lighting for after dark visits. well, with turmoil in the region, egypt's tourism industry hopes to show the country is a safe travel destination. >>> a czech painter had no interest in keeping his head above water during his latest project, and that's because this scuba diving artist was looking to sketch underwater. he managed ten caricatures in four minutes, a fete earning him a world record. and while he already holds the record for fastest caricaturist, he said it wasn't as easy as it looks. no word yet on whether his next attempt includes sky diving. a little one upper there. >>> and finally, the longhorn state of texas is looking to live up to their name. a cattle contest brings steers and cows from across the country to determine how the
spring democracy movements in tunisia and egypt. they agreed on that support at a meeting last year in france. they're nour turni they're turning attention to youth unemployment contributing to unrest in the streets. finance officials will join the meeting. it will take place on the side lines of the annual gathering of the international monetary fund and world bank. >>> greeks have seen cut after cut to their salaries and services. and there may be more to come. guch government leaders proposed budget cuts of 7.8 billion euros, $10 billion. government administrators submitted draft budget to parliament. public servants would face cuts to their salaries. the defense budget would be decreased. elderly would be hit further pension reductions. and social security payments would be reduced too. eu ministers will be watching closely. greek leaders agreed to cut more than 11 billion euros in exchange for the bailout package. they will save 60% of that with the new reductions. greek and eu ministers hatch yet to thrash out the details of the austerity measures. greek economic growth would
campaign ads against democrats who have supported funding for libya as well as pakistan and egypt. you have gotten some criticism from fellow republicans, including lindsey graham and john mccain about the effort you have lunch. speak a little bit about how you intend to move the party and if you think you will have the momentum going forward? >> if you ask people -- i have told people i can go to the kentucky democrat convention, stand in front of all democrats and tell them, we do not have enough money to send money to pakistan, egypt, libya, countries where mombs are burnig our flax. we have problems at home. we have -- our flags. i can get 90% of democrats to agree with me. we wanted these bridges to be repaired or replaced 20 years. we have money to send overseas. if you look and follow the trail of the money, so much of it is stolen. look at mubarak in egypt. he was a reliable ally who stole us blind. we gave him $60 billion over 30 years. his family is worth 10 billion- $15 billion. this happened throughout. people said, we need the foreign aid because it convinces people to like us.
of these ventures are carefully selected opposed to countries like egypt and tunisia, the syria regime is careful to limit northern direct investment in way, shape, or form. you find mercedes, four seasons hotels and so on, you find them, but in smaller numbers always connected to some sort of deal whereby the government has some criminal, if not over the ownership of the department, but the usage rights. >> host: so how has the government made this system inefficient? what has caused the inefficiencies? >> guest: the inefficiencies really are a function of how economic decisions were made based on the interest of network members rather than on a broader economic strategy that charted a future for the country based on its resources, endowments, human, and other resources, and in the end you had what i call this circumliberallization process where the benefits of the liberalization process were siphoned off by networks opposed to being spread out into society, and in the end, these tailored policies became so ram participant they started -- rampant, they started to produce outcomes, and you had th
her flaws. egypt, how great is it that she nearly took it all off, posted this picture and basically told people, bring it on? >> we're always taught as women that unless we look like this that we're imperfect. so for this woman to get out, and she looks average size of most women that i see on a day to day basis, so i say to the women, go for it. let the world know you're comfortable in your own skin. >> let me point out something. i said a moment ago she revealed her flaws. i meant to say her perceived flaws, and i think that's an important distinction in here. in that same interview this morning on the "today" show, stella told host savannah gu guthrie that she was just fed up and that's why she did it. >> there is no way to avoid the bullying i took as a child and a teen. it took years of self-searching to understand that. this isn't right. we don't have the authority to judge other people's beauty, and we don't have the authority to make assumptions about other people's health based on the way they look, and i finally came to a place where i was really happy with the way i look.
] >>> an international cross country rally in the sahara desert has opened in egypt in a bid to boost its main industry tourism. egyptians haven't seen many foreign visitors since protesters pushed their president from power last year. the rally started at the foot of pyramids near cairo. at the sign of tourism 36 vehicles from 16 european and asian countries started off. they will amendment to complete the 3,000 kilometer course in five days traveling over sand dunes and rocky terrain. teams from japanese auto makers are also participating in the race. >> translator: it's great. we can start at the foot of the pyramids and drive at high speed through the desert. there's nothing like this in japan. >> the government aims to show that egypt is safe enough to hold a large scale event. it hopes a rally will have many tourists. >>> weather is certainly a major player when planning any out door event. there's two storms churning in the west pacific affecting people in countries nearby. rachel ferguson gives us the detail. >> there certainly are. just after we get rid of one typho typhoon, there's two more t
is a good point, a fair point, which is that i think we have to be very clear in terms of egypt and other arab awakening countries going forward about what are the principles under which we're going to want to continue to fund and support these governments. i think that's a very legitimate point. but on the one hand he says -- you know, he blames obama for whatever tension there is in the u.s./israel relationship today and i would argue there's very little tension in the state-to-state relationship but a lot of tension between the prime minister of israel and the president of the united states. but all of that is entirely obama's fault. anything that's wrong with the u.s./israel relationship is obama's fault. the fact that the prime minister of israel has continued with a settlement policy which is extremely controversial in israel somehow comes no where into the equation. so we're supposed to blieve on the one hand that america's supposed to lead the arab world from the front with one hand while adopting a policy toward israel that is more pro-israeli than anything any government in wash
administration should have tried to kp hosni mubarak in power in egypt. hannity described the emerging democratic system in egypt as the rise of violence, hate, islamic extremism, madness, and death. on the other hand, you have conservative policy makers like paul wolfowitz and others who have celebrated the fall of arab tyrannies, some of whom only wish that president obama had been quicker to support the transition to elections. this debate is important. over the next few decades the middle east could see the rise of illiberal democracies, countries with elections but few individual rights, or it could see a gradual evolution toward pluralism and the rule of law. but this discussion is being superseded by a visceral reaction to islam and islamism as hannity's comments suggest that is neither accurate nor helpful in understanding what is happening on the ground. the heart of the problem in the arab world was that the old order was highly unstable. repressive regimes like the one in egypt had created over the decades extreme opposition movements. that opposition often became violent, and it attac
accounting of the benghazi terrorist attacks and the events in yemen and egypt. the white house continues to give every appearance of stone walling, both the congress and the press. almost three weeks have passed since those attacks, and leaked from within the white house, an intelligence community suggests the obama administration has been involved in an outright cover up. there are reports tonight that officials within the administration were concerned from the very beginning about the message the white house chose to push after the attack. the attack that was spontaneous they said, and not at all the work of terrorists. here's white house spokesman jay carney back on the 14th of september. >> the incident in benghazi, as well as elsewhere, but these are all being investigated, what i'm saying is that we have no evidence at this time to suggest otherwise, that there was a preplanned or alterior investigation behind the unrest. my point was that we don't have and did not have concrete evidence to suggest that this was not in reaction to the film. lou: he's referring to the almost car too
-- the new egyptian ambassador to israel came today to announce that israel -- that egypt will abide by the peace treaty -- will abide by the peace treaty with israel. but we have relied on the peace treaty, israel has relied on it. and so have we, the peace treaty with jordan, for many years. and efraim halevy deserves enormous credit for that. as haleh said, we watched developments in the middle east very closely here. the president of the yemen came a few weeks ago to speak about a way forward for his country, which is trying hard to become a strong ally in the fight against terrorism, and has huge economic challenges. we just held the second of three meetings on how women are fairing in the arab awakening. last month, former deputy secretary of state and ambassador, tom pickering, and other national security officials, military officers and experts with decades of experience presented a report that they have written. a balanced non-partisanship fact-based report on the benefits and costs of a military action against iran. a topic that i know we all are assessing. and i am sure th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,033 (some duplicates have been removed)

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